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What to expect when adjusting to student life in Canada

What to expect when adjusting to student life in Canada 

 

While choosing Canada as a destination to complete your international studies in is exciting, it presents a variety of challenges you must learn to adjust to. Depending where you’re travelling from, Canada’s culture may be quite different from your own. These differences can range from cultural and social, to academic differences. It’s important to remember adjusting to a new culture is a very gradual process, and is something each student experiences. You’ll find Canada has different values, beliefs, traditions and customs than those in your home country. The buildings may look different, people may act and dress differently, no one speaks your language, the list goes on. Adjusting to the way of life in Canada will take some time, however embrace the ups and downs in the process. You will learn a lot about yourself and your new home.

This blog post is intended to help you understand what to expect when adjusting to student life in Canada.

 

Canadian Culture

Let’s quickly start by defining culture. As defined by Cristina De Rossi in Live Science, “culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we believe is right or wrong, how we greet visitors, and a million other things.”

All this being said, Canada is a wonderful country to study in with diversity playing a large role in its history. Though there are two official languages including French and English, the country boasts itself for its mosaic of people who come from different backgrounds, creating one of the most multicultural countries in the world. The wonderful thing is, Canada encourages all people living in the country to embrace their backgrounds, traditions and culture, as it aims to protect multiculturalism. Canada features a variety of values including diversity, inclusion and fairness amongst many others. The country is recognized as one that offers a warm welcome to all visitors and new permanent residents, and as a land of opportunity.

 

Stages of transition

You will go through a number of stages before you’re comfortably settled into your new home. Keep in mind that you are not alone in this. It’s very normal to experience a variety of emotions, such as the ones listed below. However, do your best to stay open-minded, positive, strong and curious — this will help you transition.

Honeymoon

The very first stage in your transition period, the honeymoon stage, may last for a few weeks or a few months. Everything is new and you feel a sense of excitement mixed in with some nervousness and anticipation. Even before your flight, adrenaline rushes through your body and you have no time to feel your nerves. The good part is, you don’t necessarily feel the initial “shock” period of change because of this. The locals are friendly and keen on assisting you with your transition.

Hostility

Once the adrenaline wears off, you begin to experience some hostility. You realize you’re in a different country trying to adapt the new culture. Perhaps you’re having difficulties communicating with others or you’re frustrated with setting up your new phone services. You miss the ease of being at home, but remember, these feelings will wear off quickly. It’s something you must experience as you transition into your new environment.

Acceptance

At this time, you begin to accept your situation and realize what a wonderful opportunity it is. Despite challenges, you begin to accept certain situations and no longer experience hostility and frustration, but rather appreciation. You release the feeling of wanting to return home, and begin to enjoy your time as you adjust.

Adaptation

You begin to feel comfortable and more “at home” in your new environment. Things feel natural, and you both understand and enjoy the processes in the country you’re in.

 

Canadian Climate

This may be your first time experiencing diverse weather. Perhaps you’re from Brazil or India where it’s constantly hot, in which case surely you’ve never seen snow. It’s exciting to see the changes in weather throughout the year however you must be sure to pack accordingly. It also is a big adjustment! Here’s some information about the different seasons you’ll experience while studying in Canada.


Fall Season

Fall

At the start of September, the cool air starts to move in and the warm summer weather starts to move out. Perhaps the most colourful season of the year, leaves begin to change different colours from green to bright orange, fiery red and golden yellow. You can get by with a light jacket or vest, but this won’t last too long as the nights begin to get colder. This is the ideal season to go on hikes, canoe trips, bike rides and road trips.

 

 


Winter Season

Winter

The coldest season, especially in Canada. Winter begins in December and can last through to March. The season isn’t consistent every year, but you’re sure to experience a snowfall at least once. During this time, many Canadians bundle up in their winter gear and skate, toboggan, ski and snowboard outdoors. For many Canadians, this is also the time of year to cheer on our favourite ice hockey teams.

 

 

 


Spring Season

Spring

It may be a bit rainy, but spring is the season we finally begin to get over the cold winter weather. The snow begins to melt in April and May, the grass starts to regain its bright green colour and the trees and flowers blossom.

 

 

 


Summer Season

Summer

June, July and August tend to be sunny, hot and in some cities, humid. Many like the chance to get away from the city and sit by the lake up north or on a beach. Others partake in water sports such as kayaking, swimming, paddle boarding and more.

 

 

University Resources

Each school has different resources available to their student body. From assisting student transitions, offering guidance for particular courses and navigating student jobs – universities cater to all students’ needs. Be sure to visit your host school’s website to learn more about this.

 

Adjusting to a new culture will be the most interesting, challenging and exciting time of your life. It’s an opportunity of a lifetime. Be curious, positive, open-minded, humorous and strong. You’ll want to embrace every minute of it.

Student Visa Canada: How to write a study plan for Canada

When applying for a student visa in Canada, you’re required to submit a study plan. A study plan gives Visa Officers an explanation as to why you want to study in Canada and how it fits with your future objectives. With this being said, you want to ensure you make it good!

It’s important to be very clear and concise, but to also be specific. It isn’t necessary to explain your entire life history. Rather, focus on how pursuing education in Canada will help your current academic studies and career experiences.

Before we get into the types of questions you must answer when writing your study plan, here are a few quick tips.

 

#1: Do not exceed one (1) page.

#2: Your study plan should be factual.

#3: Be direct. Do not write paragraphs on why you dream of studying in Canada. Instead, write about how studying in Canada will advance your career in a way your country of residence won’t.

#4: Have someone with strong English written skills edit your study plan.

 

Study plan questions

 

1. Why do you wish to study in Canada in the program for which you have been accepted?

This is your opportunity to describe the reasons behind why you want to study in Canada. Is it because of its quality education system? The multicultural society? Why is Canada your preferred destination for international studies.

 

2. What is your overall educational goal?

Go into greater depth and describe what your goal is. Is it to continue your education directly after secondary school? Perhaps it’s to expand your knowledge by achieving a master’s or postgraduate degree. You may support your answer by discussing the field of study you’re interested in and how this particular route will further your career goals.

You may even consider doing research into the type of industry you want to work in and what the general requirements are. This helps you better understand if your educational plans align with your overall career goals.

 

3. Why are you not pursuing a similar program in your country of residence/citizenship?

Canada is well-known for its quality education system which is recognized globally. This alone may be the reason as to why you chose to pursue a program in Canada over your country. It’s possible Canada has a certain institution with the exact course or program you want to study in. One that may not be available in your country. This is reason enough to want to pursue education elsewhere.

 

4. What research have you done into studies in your country of residence/citizenship?

Don’t limit your research. Take this opportunity to discuss the options your home country gives you in regards to schools and programs. There’s a chance your country will in fact have the same program you’re hoping to pursue in Canada. You’ll want to explain why you prefer the Canadian school or program over your own. You may even choose to discuss the differences in education overall between your home country and Canada.

 

5. How will this program enhance your employment opportunities in your country of residence/citizenship? What are the job outlooks for the program?

At this time, you can discuss the various job positions you have looked into in your country. It’s possible you found a desirable job in your country, but unfortunately lack the appropriate education needed to apply for it. In this case, you can discuss how continuing your education in Canada will help prepare you for this role in your home country.

 

6. What ties do you have to your country of residence/citizenship?

For this particular question, you must state whether or not you have family in your country. This may include children, parents, a spouse or a partner.

 

7. What is your parents or guardians immigration status in their current country of residence? What are the financial assets owned by your parents?

In your study plan, be sure to include your parents or guardians immigration status. In addition to this, you must include their bank balance certificate, bank statements, investments, property, and any other documents that represent the financial assets owned by your parents or guardians.

 

8. Do you have a travel history? Please mention about your previous travels. In the case that you do not have the same, please share your parents or siblings travel history.

If you have travelled in the past, ensure you list the places you have travelled to. In the case you haven’t, it’s important to list your parents or siblings travel history. Doing so increases your chances of approval.

 

9. Who is sponsoring your education and why are they sponsoring your education?

You must list who is sponsoring your education. It may be your family, host school or an organization. Most importantly, you must explain why it is they’re sponsoring your education.

 

10. Provide details of your education history – dates when the course started and ended, the name and address of the school.

In this section, you must provide details of all the schools you have attended to date. Details include the start and end dates, full institution name(s), and address(s). You must also state the programs completed if you’ve attended college or university.

Finally, share your work history in this section. This includes any jobs or volunteer positions you’ve held, and how they may help with your studies and overall goals.

 

To complete your study plan, summarize your educational goals and the reasons behind why you want to study in Canada. In addition, it’s common courtesy to thank the person you’re writing to.

 

For further guidance, please visit the Government of Canada site.

A pre-departure guide for international students

Once you’ve received your Letter of Acceptance from your desired school of international studies and have accepted it, you must think about what you need for your pre-departure. Things start to get real! In just a few short months, you’ll be on your way to North America, perhaps for the very first time.

Surely you’ve put a lot of time into gathering required documents to ensure your acceptance, but unfortunately you’re not done just yet. There are still many steps to complete before you can comfortably enjoy your time abroad. We’ve put together a pre-departure guide approved by the Canadian government to assist you!

 

Checklist

  • First and foremost, be sure to accept your offer letter if you haven’t already done so! If you have any questions about this, contact ApplyBoard or your host school.
  • Ensure you have a valid passport. Check to see if it’s valid for a minimum of six months after your return date. If you don’t have a passport, you must apply for one immediately.
  • It’s important to review the documents needed to enter Canada. You may have to present these upon your arrival.
  • Monitor the cost of flights and book the most suitable one. You might consider a travel agent if you’re unsure of how to book a flight yourself. If you are booking a return flight, we recommend the flexible flight ticket as dates may change and you may want to leave at a later or sooner time. This way you will avoid additional fees.
  • Travel insurance is critical should there be any issues during your travel time. This can be purchased separate from your flight ticket, or at the same time.
  • Along with travel insurance, health insurance is extremely important. Your school may insure you, however it is best to confirm.
  • In case you don’t already know, timing for international flights is different from local flights. It’s suggested you arrive for your flight at least three hours before departure to avoid any potential line ups for luggage drop-off and security, or other issues. You will likely be able to check-in for your flight 24 hours beforehand online.
Be aware of the restrictions upon entering Canada

 

  • Certain items are restricted or prohibited to come to Canada such as tobacco, firearms, food, alcohol, animal and plant products, and drugs. Any liquids you may have with you must be in a container of 100 ml or less, and packaged in a plastic bag.
  • Oftentimes, border officers ask about your accommodations. Ensure you know this information including the address, contact name and number.
  • We suggest you have some Canadian money on you for when you land in case you must pay for public transit, a taxi or are simply in need of replenishment.
  • Keep all of your most valuable items and documents on hand and not in your checked luggage in case it is misplaced or lost.

 

We suggest making photocopies of the important documents in the event you misplace them, this way you have a back up

 

  • Important documents include your passport, flight ticket, travel and health insurance, Canadian letter of acceptance, accommodation details, proof of funds, school transcripts, Canadian immigration letter (for some).
  • Consider researching your destination prior to your arrival. This is the exciting part of your pre-departure! Things to do, what the weather may be like, items to pack, etc.
  • If you have some spare time, practice your English communication skills. The more you practice, the better. In most cases, reality is quite different from what you learn in books.

 

Canadian Study Permit Visa Approval Rate

Canadian Study Permit Visa Approval Rate for the Last two Years

2015 2016 2016(Jan-Mar) 2017(Jan-Mar)
Source: IRCC(EDW) as of May 15, 2017 Passed Failed Total Approval % Passed Failed Total Approval % Passed Failed Total Approval % Passed Failed Total Approval %
Grand Total 129,553 53,471 183,024 70.78% 157,979 71,683 229,662 68.79% 16,080 9,922 26,002 61.84% 22,930 14,969 37,899 60.50%
Afghanistan 16 101 117 13.68% 12 148 160 7.50% 1 18 19 5.26% 3 48 51 5.88%
Albania 90 174 264 34.09% 93 200 293 31.74% 9 48 57 15.79% 19 35 54 35.19%
Algeria 387 1,125 1,512 25.60% 454 1,541 1,995 22.76% 63 234 297 21.21% 100 312 412 24.27%
Andorra 2 2 100.00% 1 1 100.00%
Angola 31 19 50 62.00% 6 18 24 25.00% 2 2 0.00% 1 5 6 16.67%
Antigua and Barbuda 43 10 53 81.13% 58 14 72 80.56% 7 2 9 77.78% 3 4 7 42.86%
Argentina 103 14 117 88.03% 120 12 132 90.91% 17 3 20 85.00% 21 3 24 87.50%
Armenia 7 19 26 26.92% 19 26 45 42.22% 2 1 3 66.67% 3 7 10 30.00%
Australia 350 36 386 90.67% 321 24 345 93.04% 23 1 24 95.83% 21 5 26 80.77%
Austria 96 6 102 94.12% 117 4 121 96.69% 9 9 100.00% 12 12 100.00%
Azerbaijan 53 16 69 76.81% 60 74 134 44.78% 1 16 17 5.88% 7 9 16 43.75%
Bahama Islands, The 351 31 382 91.88% 585 56 641 91.26% 31 7 38 81.58% 48 7 55 87.27%
Bahrain 20 8 28 71.43% 33 11 44 75.00% 1 3 4 25.00% 3 2 5 60.00%
Bangladesh 753 699 1,452 51.86% 1,062 948 2,010 52.84% 57 100 157 36.31% 158 203 361 43.77%
Barbados 138 7 145 95.17% 153 10 163 93.87% 10 1 11 90.91% 15 1 16 93.75%
Belarus 29 51 80 36.25% 29 50 79 36.71% 2 10 12 16.67% 2 6 8 25.00%
Belgium 218 26 244 89.34% 302 32 334 90.42% 20 3 23 86.96% 15 2 17 88.24%
Belize 38 8 46 82.61% 49 19 68 72.06% 4 1 5 80.00% 1 3 4 25.00%
Benin, Peoples Republic of 225 120 345 65.22% 148 330 478 30.96% 36 45 81 44.44% 33 47 80 41.25%
Bhutan 2 7 9 22.22% 13 10 23 56.52% 1 2 3 33.33% 1 1 100.00%
Bolivia 45 16 61 73.77% 36 12 48 75.00% 8 8 100.00% 3 8 11 27.27%
Bosnia-Hercegovina 11 14 25 44.00% 11 14 25 44.00% 3 3 6 50.00% 1 4 5 20.00%
Botswana, Republic of 32 8 40 80.00% 24 7 31 77.42% 2 2 100.00% 2 2 4 50.00%
Brazil 5,358 664 6,022 88.97% 5,955 1,528 7,483 79.58% 996 350 1,346 74.00% 1,095 268 1,363 80.34%
Brunei 4 1 5 80.00% 6 4 10 60.00% 1 1 0.00%
Bulgaria 34 29 63 53.97% 36 9 45 80.00% 1 2 3 33.33% 1 1 0.00%
Burkina-Faso 178 148 326 54.60% 171 224 395 43.29% 17 18 35 48.57% 9 32 41 21.95%
Burundi 80 80 160 50.00% 157 291 448 35.04% 17 15 32 53.13% 31 62 93 33.33%
Cambodia 31 87 118 26.27% 24 68 92 26.09% 5 11 16 31.25% 7 6 13 53.85%
Cameroon, Federal Republic of 623 2,538 3,161 19.71% 507 2,970 3,477 14.58% 59 354 413 14.29% 46 432 478 9.62%
Cape Verde Islands 2 2 100.00%
Central African Republic 18 37 55 32.73% 18 39 57 31.58% 1 4 5 20.00% 5 5 0.00%
Chad, Republic of 29 34 63 46.03% 14 69 83 16.87% 2 15 17 11.76% 1 16 17 5.88%
Chile 201 24 225 89.33% 239 30 269 88.85% 40 2 42 95.24% 65 11 76 85.53%
China, People’s Republic of 31,764 5,647 37,411 84.91% 32,737 4,508 37,245 87.90% 3,675 738 4,413 83.28% 3,794 885 4,679 81.09%
Colombia 1,073 387 1,460 73.49% 1,384 311 1,695 81.65% 255 81 336 75.89% 416 73 489 85.07%
Comoros 3 4 7 42.86% 5 8 13 38.46% 1 1 0.00% 1 1 0.00%
Congo, Democratic Republic of the 323 907 1,230 26.26% 341 1,548 1,889 18.05% 36 123 159 22.64% 14 111 125 11.20%
Congo, People’s Republic of the 78 202 280 27.86% 53 274 327 16.21% 6 26 32 18.75% 8 52 60 13.33%
Costa Rica 47 8 55 85.45% 50 12 62 80.65% 7 5 12 58.33% 7 7 100.00%
Croatia 40 11 51 78.43% 37 12 49 75.51% 3 2 5 60.00% 5 3 8 62.50%
Cuba 41 51 92 44.57% 34 53 87 39.08% 4 15 19 21.05% 3 5 8 37.50%
Cyprus 10 1 11 90.91% 5 1 6 83.33% 1 1 2 50.00%
Czech Republic 75 13 88 85.23% 98 11 109 89.91% 12 1 13 92.31% 15 5 20 75.00%
Denmark 86 9 95 90.53% 75 14 89 84.27% 8 2 10 80.00% 6 2 8 75.00%
Djibouti, Republic of 8 27 35 22.86% 20 42 62 32.26% 3 4 7 42.86% 3 8 11 27.27%
Dominica 7 2 9 77.78% 19 6 25 76.00% 2 1 3 66.67% 1 1 100.00%
Dominican Republic 135 51 186 72.58% 171 54 225 76.00% 25 7 32 78.13% 31 21 52 59.62%
Ecuador 339 60 399 84.96% 436 74 510 85.49% 42 12 54 77.78% 41 9 50 82.00%
Egypt 520 300 820 63.41% 695 465 1,160 59.91% 52 42 94 55.32% 104 108 212 49.06%
El Salvador 107 41 148 72.30% 123 60 183 67.21% 10 16 26 38.46% 19 22 41 46.34%
Equatorial Guinea, Republic of 2 8 10 20.00% 2 3 5 40.00% 9 1 10 90.00%
Eritrea 10 46 56 17.86% 18 78 96 18.75% 3 5 8 37.50% 22 22 0.00%
Estonia 15 4 19 78.95% 19 5 24 79.17% 4 4 100.00% 1 1 100.00%
Ethiopia 82 95 177 46.33% 83 248 331 25.08% 6 14 20 30.00% 13 41 54 24.07%
Fiji 3 6 9 33.33% 15 11 26 57.69% 6 4 10 60.00% 1 1 0.00%
Finland 87 5 92 94.57% 98 6 104 94.23% 3 1 4 75.00% 9 9 100.00%
France 8486 467 8953 94.78% 8,259 515 8,774 94.13% 402 59 461 87.20% 511 66 577 88.56%
Gabon Republic 35 52 87 40.23% 32 79 111 28.83% 5 11 16 31.25% 6 17 23 26.09%
Gambia 21 95 116 18.10% 28 174 202 13.86% 5 21 26 19.23% 2 20 22 9.09%
Georgia 5 13 18 27.78% 12 25 37 32.43% 5 5 0.00% 1 6 7 14.29%
Germany, Federal Republic of 1,688 88 1,776 95.05% 1,839 121 1,960 93.83% 121 6 127 95.28% 119 17 136 87.50%
Ghana 509 976 1,485 34.28% 481 2,388 2,869 16.77% 106 408 514 20.62% 81 281 362 22.38%
Greece 78 20 98 79.59% 74 21 95 77.89% 8 5 13 61.54% 15 2 17 88.24%
Grenada 18 8 26 69.23% 34 4 38 89.47% 2 2 100.00% 4 4 100.00%
Guatemala 30 19 49 61.22% 40 20 60 66.67% 5 5 10 50.00% 8 2 10 80.00%
Guinea, Republic of 46 105 151 30.46% 156 572 728 21.43% 17 19 36 47.22% 12 49 61 19.67%
Guinea-Bissau 1 5 6 16.67% 1 3 4 25.00% 1 1 0.00% 1 3 4 25.00%
Guyana 84 43 127 66.14% 99 38 137 72.26% 8 10 18 44.44% 13 9 22 59.09%
Haiti 111 254 365 30.41% 220 234 454 48.46% 25 35 60 41.67% 21 64 85 24.71%
Honduras 37 27 64 57.81% 79 37 116 68.10% 3 6 9 33.33% 10 2 12 83.33%
Hong Kong SAR 1,015 169 1,184 85.73% 986 129 1,115 88.43% 56 19 75 74.67% 74 21 95 77.89%
Hungary 52 27 79 65.82% 64 25 89 71.91% 9 5 14 64.29% 6 1 7 85.71%
Iceland 39 7 46 84.78% 20 5 25 80.00% 5 5 100.00% 2 2 0.00%
India 24,712 13,953 38,665 63.91% 43,740 20,469 64,209 68.12% 2,409 2,608 5,017 48.02% 6,928 4,796 11,724 59.09%
Indonesia, Republic of 437 44 481 90.85% 505 90 595 84.87% 28 13 41 68.29% 43 19 62 69.35%
Iran 1,143 436 1,579 72.39% 1,673 761 2,434 68.73% 174 80 254 68.50% 410 186 596 68.79%
Iraq 26 140 166 15.66% 65 252 317 20.50% 6 30 36 16.67% 5 79 84 5.95%
Ireland, Republic of 112 12 124 90.32% 126 9 135 93.33% 10 1 11 90.91% 8 8 100.00%
Israel 202 162 364 55.49% 228 89 317 71.92% 33 13 46 71.74% 44 10 54 81.48%
Italy 770 99 869 88.61% 987 91 1,078 91.56% 84 11 95 88.42% 72 22 94 76.60%
Ivory Coast, Republic of 357 369 726 49.17% 371 814 1,185 31.31% 42 94 136 30.88% 30 126 156 19.23%
Jamaica 963 391 1,354 71.12% 914 709 1,623 56.32% 106 57 163 65.03% 52 152 204 25.49%
Japan 4,934 132 5,066 97.39% 5,130 119 5,249 97.73% 1,411 19 1,430 98.67% 1,326 37 1,363 97.29%
Jordan 144 146 290 49.66% 266 234 500 53.20% 28 27 55 50.91% 31 78 109 28.44%
Kazakhstan 259 152 411 63.02% 354 177 531 66.67% 23 33 56 41.07% 19 23 42 45.24%
Kenya 325 252 577 56.33% 444 456 900 49.33% 35 32 67 52.24% 41 60 101 40.59%
Korea, Republic of 8,549 465 9,014 94.84% 8,873 339 9,212 96.32% 1,774 52 1,826 97.15% 1,999 68 2,067 96.71%
Kosovo, Republic of 27 41 68 39.71% 13 35 48 27.08% 7 9 16 43.75% 5 5 0.00%
Kuwait 99 7 106 93.40% 90 10 100 90.00% 6 6 100.00% 14 7 21 66.67%
Kyrgyzstan 13 34 47 27.66% 32 55 87 36.78% 1 5 6 16.67% 6 6 12 50.00%
Laos 10 6 16 62.50% 10 16 26 38.46% 1 3 4 25.00% 1 2 3 33.33%
Latvia 10 11 21 47.62% 16 9 25 64.00% 2 2 100.00%
Lebanon 234 151 385 60.78% 290 192 482 60.17% 31 25 56 55.36% 34 33 67 50.75%
Liberia 3 11 14 21.43% 8 15 23 34.78% 1 1 100.00% 2 2 0.00%
Libya 28 367 395 7.09% 46 176 222 20.72% 4 49 53 7.55% 7 46 53 13.21%
Lithuania 21 19 40 52.50% 15 9 24 62.50% 2 3 5 40.00% 5 5 100.00%
Luxembourg 22 1 23 95.65% 33 1 34 97.06% 1 1 100.00% 1 1 100.00%
Macao SAR 107 18 125 85.60% 85 6 91 93.41% 8 8 100.00% 5 1 6 83.33%
Macedonia, FYR 19 21 40 47.50% 16 20 36 44.44% 1 1 2 50.00% 2 1 3 66.67%
Madagascar 67 66 133 50.38% 97 106 203 47.78% 11 10 21 52.38% 12 25 37 32.43%
Malawi 11 12 23 47.83% 15 18 33 45.45% 1 1 2 50.00% 2 2 4 50.00%
Malaysia 352 71 423 83.22% 405 89 494 81.98% 21 13 34 61.76% 24 8 32 75.00%
Maldives, Republic of 2 2 100.00% 4 2 6 66.67% 2 2 100.00% 1 1 2 50.00%
Mali, Republic of 212 269 481 44.07% 228 538 766 29.77% 38 98 136 27.94% 25 107 132 18.94%
Malta 3 1 4 75.00% 3 1 4 75.00%
Mauritania 24 49 73 32.88% 28 71 99 28.28% 2 9 11 18.18% 3 14 17 17.65%
Mauritius 280 170 450 62.22% 354 191 545 64.95% 16 21 37 43.24% 28 27 55 50.91%
Mexico 3,378 353 3,731 90.54% 4,042 267 4,309 93.80% 351 45 396 88.64% 425 54 479 88.73%
Moldova 19 27 46 41.30% 17 30 47 36.17% 1 3 4 25.00% 1 1 100.00%
Monaco 3 3 100.00% 2 2 100.00%
Mongolia, People’s Republic of 54 129 183 29.51% 74 100 174 42.53% 14 14 0.00% 2 13 15 13.33%
Montenegro, Republic of 4 1 5 80.00% 4 1 5 80.00% 1 1 100.00%
Morocco 776 816 1,592 48.74% 891 912 1,803 49.42% 70 103 173 40.46% 85 139 224 37.95%
Mozambique 9 5 14 64.29% 2 4 6 33.33% 2 2 0.00%
Myanmar (Burma) 4 11 15 26.67% 17 23 40 42.50% 4 4 0.00% 2 1 3 66.67%
Namibia 5 5 10 50.00% 6 8 14 42.86% 1 1 100.00%
Nepal 90 546 636 14.15% 135 649 784 17.22% 17 161 178 9.55% 14 98 112 12.50%
Netherlands, The 209 22 231 90.48% 225 28 253 88.93% 27 6 33 81.82% 18 10 28 64.29%
New Zealand 75 12 87 86.21% 81 8 89 91.01% 5 5 100.00% 8 8 100.00%
Nicaragua 9 10 19 47.37% 11 6 17 64.71% 1 1 100.00% 2 4 6 33.33%
Niger, Republic of the 49 53 102 48.04% 48 86 134 35.82% 6 5 11 54.55% 3 23 26 11.54%
Nigeria 3,560 5,343 8,903 39.99% 2,501 7,772 10,273 24.35% 374 1,287 1,661 22.52% 371 2,174 2,545 14.58%
Norway 140 8 148 94.59% 127 10 137 92.70% 4 4 100.00% 14 14 100.00%
Oman 60 8 68 88.24% 61 4 65 93.85% 4 4 100.00% 2 7 9 22.22%
Pakistan 1,177 1,991 3,168 37.15% 1,224 3,119 4,343 28.18% 149 229 378 39.42% 129 863 992 13.00%
Palestinian Authority (Gaza/West Bank) 54 108 162 33.33% 71 197 268 26.49% 9 29 38 23.68% 7 55 62 11.29%
Panama, Republic of 68 14 82 82.93% 68 18 86 79.07% 16 4 20 80.00% 18 2 20 90.00%
Papua New Guinea 2 1 3 66.67% 1 1 2 50.00% 1 1 100.00% 1 1 0.00%
Paraguay 12 3 15 80.00% 19 4 23 82.61% 1 3 4 25.00% 2 2 100.00%
Peru 225 74 299 75.25% 287 88 375 76.53% 51 21 72 70.83% 37 18 55 67.27%
Philippines 723 800 1,523 47.47% 1,220 1,238 2,458 49.63% 134 162 296 45.27% 260 270 530 49.06%
Poland 70 36 106 66.04% 84 30 114 73.68% 8 5 13 61.54% 12 2 14 85.71%
Portugal 115 61 176 65.34% 146 48 194 75.26% 15 3 18 83.33% 19 8 27 70.37%
Qatar 8 3 11 72.73% 14 14 100.00% 5 5 100.00%
Romania 58 38 96 60.42% 58 28 86 67.44% 3 4 7 42.86% 10 1 11 90.91%
Russia 750 585 1,335 56.18% 720 466 1,186 60.71% 45 73 118 38.14% 62 61 123 50.41%
Rwanda 149 96 245 60.82% 242 266 508 47.64% 19 31 50 38.00% 30 51 81 37.04%
Saudi Arabia 3,157 598 3,755 84.07% 2,206 507 2,713 81.31% 276 73 349 79.08% 240 69 309 77.67%
Senegal 399 1,031 1,430 27.90% 318 1,369 1,687 18.85% 31 135 166 18.67% 23 156 179 12.85%
Serbia, Republic of 58 42 100 58.00% 56 40 96 58.33% 9 6 15 60.00% 3 4 7 42.86%
Sierra Leone 9 22 31 29.03% 11 42 53 20.75% 2 5 7 28.57% 1 7 8 12.50%
Singapore 169 13 182 92.86% 149 26 175 85.14% 14 3 17 82.35% 23 8 31 74.19%
Slovak Republic 97 14 111 87.39% 118 9 127 92.91% 15 1 16 93.75% 17 2 19 89.47%
Somalia, Democratic Republic of 5 8 13 38.46% 2 15 17 11.76% 3 3 0.00% 1 4 5 20.00%
South Africa, Republic of 169 57 226 74.78% 210 125 335 62.69% 25 11 36 69.44% 28 25 53 52.83%
South Sudan, Republic Of 3 6 9 33.33% 6 8 14 42.86% 1 1 0.00% 1 2 3 33.33%
Spain 835 57 892 93.61% 1,154 68 1,222 94.44% 61 13 74 82.43% 61 8 69 88.41%
Sri Lanka 157 226 383 40.99% 256 269 525 48.76% 20 30 50 40.00% 21 40 61 34.43%
St. Kitts-Nevis 16 15 31 51.61% 19 4 23 82.61% 1 1 2 50.00% 2 1 3 66.67%
St. Lucia 37 25 62 59.68% 47 22 69 68.12% 1 7 8 12.50% 2 3 5 40.00%
St. Vincent and the Grenadines 17 7 24 70.83% 19 12 31 61.29% 1 3 4 25.00% 2 2 4 50.00%
Stateless 39 55 94 41.49% 32 56 88 36.36% 5 7 12 41.67% 5 17 22 22.73%
Sudan, Democratic Republic of 37 65 102 36.27% 41 98 139 29.50% 10 18 28 35.71% 5 28 33 15.15%
Swaziland 3 2 5 60.00% 2 9 11 18.18% 2 2 0.00% 2 2 0.00%
Sweden 165 15 180 91.67% 165 11 176 93.75% 10 10 100.00% 12 3 15 80.00%
Switzerland 357 30 387 92.25% 364 26 390 93.33% 23 1 24 95.83% 26 2 28 92.86%
Syria 94 237 331 28.40% 86 308 394 21.83% 12 37 49 24.49% 16 47 63 25.40%
Tadjikistan 6 22 28 21.43% 8 26 34 23.53% 5 5 0.00% 5 5 0.00%
Taiwan 1,268 227 1,495 84.82% 1,523 157 1,680 90.65% 84 23 107 78.50% 218 25 243 89.71%
Tanzania, United Republic of 193 55 248 77.82% 196 94 290 67.59% 16 10 26 61.54% 22 17 39 56.41%
Thailand 458 179 637 71.90% 478 172 650 73.54% 56 23 79 70.89% 37 22 59 62.71%
Togo, Republic of 205 155 360 56.94% 125 459 584 21.40% 38 76 114 33.33% 37 60 97 38.14%
Trinidad and Tobago, Republic of 141 33 174 81.03% 168 54 222 75.68% 17 6 23 73.91% 17 9 26 65.38%
Tunisia 521 609 1,130 46.11% 549 565 1,114 49.28% 73 62 135 54.07% 101 84 185 54.59%
Turkey 1,393 359 1,752 79.51% 1,871 763 2,634 71.03% 205 127 332 61.75% 323 199 522 61.88%
Turkmenistan 6 9 15 40.00% 3 10 13 23.08% 2 2 0.00% 1 1 2 50.00%
Uganda 99 89 188 52.66% 155 125 280 55.36% 21 15 36 58.33% 30 28 58 51.72%
Ukraine 1,006 809 1,815 55.43% 1,082 576 1,658 65.26% 125 89 214 58.41% 90 81 171 52.63%
United Arab Emirates 27 7 34 79.41% 23 11 34 67.65% 1 1 100.00% 2 2 100.00%
United Kingdom and Colonies 1,517 116 1,633 92.90% 1,646 134 1,780 92.47% 79 6 85 92.94% 86 12 98 87.76%
United States of America 1828 186 2014 90.76% 2155 183 2338 92.17% 127 13 140 90.71% 193 25 218 88.53%
Uruguay 9 9 100.00% 15 4 19 78.95% 1 2 3 33.33% 9 1 10 90.00%
Uzbekistan 22 83 105 20.95% 16 116 132 12.12% 2 13 15 13.33% 26 26 0.00%
Venezuela 526 681 1,207 43.58% 656 365 1,021 64.25% 116 70 186 62.37% 104 77 181 57.46%
Vietnam, Socialist Republic of 1,113 1,246 2,359 47.18% 3,920 1,629 5,549 70.64% 528 447 975 54.15% 1,303 437 1,740 74.89%
Yemen, Republic of 50 223 273 18.32% 88 285 373 23.59% 13 53 66 19.70% 13 106 119 10.92%
Zambia 64 26 90 71.11% 29 49 78 37.18% 1 7 8 12.50% 8 7 15 53.33%
Zimbabwe 216 162 378 57.14% 336 305 641 52.42% 41 18 59 69.49% 22 37 59 37.29%
Other* 3 10 13 23.08% 2 3 5 40.00% 0 2 2 0.00% 1 1 2 50.00%

Canada revamps processing times system for some Canadian permanent residence applications

Canada permanent residence applications will be processed based on projected time.

The Government of Canada announced on August 9 that processing time estimates for some Canadian permanent residence applications will now be based on pending applications undergoing processing rather than historical data of applications processed in the past.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) replaced the previous method of historical processing time forecasting, which was based on how long it took to process 80 per cent of applications in the past year. The new projected time approach will benefit some prospective permanent resident applicants by displaying processing times based on the current number of applications waiting to be processed and how quickly IRCC expects to process 80 per cent of those applications.

Projected processing times are now available for the following Canadian permanent resident categories:

With this update to processing times estimations, IRCC looks to expedite processing of applications and provide individuals eligible for permanent immigration to Canada a clearer pathway to permanent residence.

Find further details about this exciting change on CICNews.